Greg Tylka

Dr. Greg Tylka is a Morrill Professor in the Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology at Iowa State University with extension and research responsibilities for management of plant-parasitic nematodes. The focus of Dr. Tylka's research program at Iowa State University is primarily the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines. Current research includes study of SCN-resistant soybean varieties, effects of nematode-protectant seed treatments, and the effects of cover crops on SCN biology and management. He also serves as director of the Iowa Soybean Research Center at Iowa State University.

Activities of the Tylka laboratory are primarily funded by the soybean checkoff, through grants from the Iowa Soybean Association, the North Central Soybean Research Program, and the United Soybean Board.

Dr. Tylka was born and raised in southwestern Pennsylvania, just outside of Pittsburgh. He attended California University of Pennsylvania, where he earned his bachelor's degree and master's degree in biology. He then attended the University of Georgia, where he earned his doctoral degree in plant pathology.

Dr. Tylka joined Iowa State University in February 1990.

Greg Tylka photo
November 12, 2021 10:30 AM

Farmers may be planning to grow soybeans in 2022 in fields cropped to soybeans in 2021 because of high prices and limited availability of inputs for corn production. Doing this in fields infested with the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is always a risky proposition. But growing beans on beans in...

Plant Diseases
January 23, 2019 2:23 PM

The Iowa Soybean Association has hosted a farmer-oriented research conference in February for many years. In 2019, the event is moving out into the state. The ISA Farmer Research Tour will be held at three locations in the first two weeks of February. This article contains the dates and...

Crop Production
October 23, 2017 4:07 PM

I’ve received lots of inquiries in the past few weeks about sampling fields for nematodes that feed on corn. Most every Iowa field has one or more different nematode species present at low numbers. But it’s only when numbers are at damaging levels that yield loss will occur.

Unfortunately...

Plant Diseases