Integrated Crop Management News

Links to these articles are strongly encouraged. Articles may be republished without further permission if published as written and if credit is given to the author, Integrated Crop Management News, and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. If articles are used in any other manner, permission from the author is required.

Check Your Corn for Aphids

August 1, 2018
bird cherry oat aphid

Since 2010, aphids have been colonizing corn later in the summer and are building up to striking levels in Iowa. They can be found at the base of the stalk, around the ear and sometimes above the ear leaf. It seems these aphids have been sighted in corn again this summer (Photo 1).

New Soybean Pest in Iowa: Soybean Gall Midge

July 31, 2018
soybean gall midge

In 2016 and 2017, there were isolated reports of soybean injury by soybean gall midge in northwest Iowa. Confirmations were reported in 2011 from Nebraska and in 2015 from South Dakota. In 2018, the distribution in Iowa has spread to twelve Iowa counties (Figure 1). This article hopes to raise awareness about a new soybean pest and confirm any additional infested Iowa counties.

Crop Injury Associated with Growth Regulator Herbicides

July 3, 2018
picloram

While off-target dicamba injury to soybean has dominated the news the past year, it is important to recognize that dicamba is not the only Group 4 herbicide (HG4) capable of injuring soybean. These herbicides mimic the activity of indole acetic acid (IAA), a hormone that regulates the activity of numerous genes involved in plant growth. IAA also is referred to as auxin. HG4 products can induce plant responses at lower doses than most other herbicide groups, thus off-target injury has been a problem since their introduction in the 1940’s. This article will discuss some of

Weather Conditions Ripe for Physoderma Brown Spot and Node Rot and Gray Leaf Spot

June 29, 2018
physoderma brown spot on corn

With most corn in Iowa at the V7-V12 range, it’s important to be aware of potential corn diseases at this particular time. Given the wet growing conditions over the last month, corn in parts of Iowa will be very susceptible to Physoderma brown spot and node rot, caused by the fungus Physoderma maydis, and gray leaf spot, caused by the fungus Cercospora zeae-maydis.

Potential Nitrogen Loss - 2018

June 22, 2018
rainfaill map april 1 to june 22

High rainfall in some areas the past couple of weeks has produced another wet spring in Iowa. This leads to questions about nitrogen (N) loss and need for supplemental N application to corn. Unfortunately, this question has become almost the norm - I have written approximately 20 articles on the subject since 2007.

Japanese Beetle Adults Emerge in Southern Iowa

June 14, 2018
degree day map for Japanese beetle

Japanese beetle is an invasive insect that feeds on corn and soybean plus many other plants. This pest has been in Iowa since 1994 but its distribution in field crops is considered sporadic around the state. Statewide populations in field crops have been variable since 2014 and it is unclear if pressure will be significant this year. Several reports around Iowa indicated high numbers of grubs within fields, but it is not clear if they were Japanese beetle or another closely-related species. Adult emergence well before corn silking is noteworthy.


SCN Females Seen on Roots as Early as Ever in 2018

June 12, 2018
Adult soybean cyst nematode(SCN) females on soybean roots collected on June 5, 2018, from a field in southeast Boone County that was planted on May 10, 2018. There are more than a dozen SCN females on the roots shown in the image.

The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is a major pathogen of soybean in Iowa and throughout the Midwest. Damage often goes unrecognized until lower-than-expected yields are harvested because above-ground symptoms may not be obvious, especially when adequate or excess rainfall occurs during the season. A key way to check fields for this pest is to dig soybean roots and look for the small, round, white adult SCN females. It typically takes 5 to 6 weeks or more after planting for the first SCN females of the growing season to develop and appear on roots.


Navigating Through a Soil Health Assessment

June 7, 2018
no-till and cover crop

Building soil health is important to sustain soil resiliency and productivity. Many conservation practices can maintain and enhance physical, chemical and biological soil properties that contribute to overall soil biological functions as fundamental drivers that support plant growth and productivity. However, these properties are complex and interrelated as each function is influenced by a central building block, soil organic matter (SOM). Soil health is one of the co-benefits of improving SOM through soil carbon sequestration or storage.

Stalk Borers Moving in Central and Southern Iowa

June 6, 2018
Degree day map of stalk borer

Tracking degree days is a useful tool to estimate when common stalk borer larvae begin moving into cornfields from their overwintering hosts. Foliar insecticide applications, if needed, are only effective when larvae are migrating and exposed. Start scouting corn for larvae when 1,300-1,400 degree days (base 41°F) have accumulated. Counties south of I-80 in Iowa reached this important benchmark this week (Figure 1), and therefore scouting for migrating larvae should begin now to make timely treatment decisions. Stalk borer larvae in northern counties will migrate later in June.

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